Frontotemporal Dementia

ERIKA HAYASAKI JAN 9, 2014
Source: The Atlantic
A Lesser-Known Dementia That Steals Personality
Frontotemporal dementia, unlike Alzheimer’s, often hits people in the prime of their lives, and can make them act like a completely different person.

 

Source: Connecticut Fronto-temporal Dementia Foundation
FTD: “It Is What It Is” chronicles four families as they confront FTD. By telling their stories, these families reflect experiences common to many and become harbingers of hope.  The DVD is accompanied by a 12-page informational booklet on frontotemporal degeneration, which is also available to download free of charge.

Frontotemporal Dementia is the disease you’ve never heard of. Commonly referred to as FTD,  Frontotemporal Dementia is a dementia similar to Alzheimer’s Disease.  While Alzheimer’s Disease accounts for 50 to 80 percent of those diagnosed with dementia, FTD represents 10 to 20 percent of dementia cases, affecting men and women equally. The frontal and/or temporal lobes are what gets damaged from the disease. 

Frontotemporal Dementia is characterized by changes in behavior, personality, language and/or motor skills, as well as deterioration in a person’s ability to function. FTD is a progressive disease striking a younger population with symptoms typically occurring between the ages of 50 to early 60’s. The effects of FTD however, are just as devastating as those of Alzheimer’s and tragically there is no cure.

(submitted by DJ Nucci)